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Alaska Communications to Launch 2.5 Gigabit Broadband Service

Fiber optic
(Image credit: Pixabay)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska—Alaska Communications has announced that this summer it will start offering ultra-low latency, symmetric 2.5 gigabit per second fiber-optic network connectivity directly to select homes and businesses in Anchorage, Fairbanks and Soldotna Alaska.

“Internet usage and behaviors only a few short years ago relied primarily on download speed,” said Mark Ayers, vice president, engineering with Alaska Communications. “With the increase in remote work and homeschooling, many families now have multiple simultaneous users doing video conferencing, gaming and content streaming in the same home. Our new fiber product enables users to access symmetric speeds. Fiber to the home connectivity provides the highest speed, lowest latency internet currently available in the world. These significant technical improvements over cable modem service provide a dramatically improved experience for high demand applications like gaming and high-definition video conferencing. The speeds available also give customers the confidence that they’ll never be competing with their neighbor for bandwidth at peak usage times like holidays and evenings.”

The Alaska Communications Fiber offering for unlimited data with a no term contract has packages starting at 250 Mbps and going up to 2.5 Gbps.

Select neighborhoods in Anchorage, Fairbanks and Soldotna are eligible this year, with more planned in future years, the company said. 

More information is available here (opens in new tab).  

George Winslow is the senior content producer for TV Tech. He has written about the television, media and technology industries for nearly 30 years for such publications as Broadcasting & Cable, Multichannel News and TV Tech. Over the years, he has edited a number of magazines, including Multichannel News International and World Screen, and moderated panels at such major industry events as NAB and MIP TV. He has published two books and dozens of encyclopedia articles on such subjects as the media, New York City history and economics.