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First Batch of EEO Audit Letters on the Way

FCC seal
(Image credit: FCC)

Are you on the FCC’s EEO audit list?

On March 21, the Federal Communications Commission announced that a randomly selected group of U.S. radio and television stations will soon be receiving Equal Employment Opportunity audit letters.

This group is part of the first batch sent in 2022 by the Enforcement Bureau. In accordance with the commission’s EEO guidelines, the FCC must annually audit the EEO programs of randomly selected broadcast licensees. Approximately 5% of all radio and television stations will be selected for an EEO audit.

On March 21, the bureau released a list of stations included in this first audit (PDF). Stations have until May 5 to upload responses to their online public inspection page.

Depending on the size of the station, the Enforcement Bureau will be asking for different EEO-related information.

A station — or a group of stations referred to as a unit —with more than five full-time employees will be asked to submit a minimal amount of information; those with five or more full-time employees must submit more detailed information.

The latter group must submit copies of the unit’s two most recent EEO Public File reports, proof that the EEO report is posted on each website for every station that maintains one, details on full-time employees like date of hire, copies of all advertisements and other communications announcing the position, the total number of interviewees for each vacancy, participation in events like job fairs and mentoring programs, examples of any pending or resolved complaints regarding unlawful discrimination in employment practices and other details.

Response to the FCC’s audit letter must be uploaded to the FCC-hosted online public inspection file belonging to each station in a group by May 5. Those looking for an extension must make that request via email (EB-EEO@fcc.gov) at least five days before the deadline.

Susan Ashworth is the former editor of TV Technology. In addition to her work covering the broadcast television industry, she has served as editor of two housing finance magazines and written about topics as varied as education, radio, chess, music and sports. Outside of her life as a writer, she recently served as president of a local nonprofit organization supporting girls in baseball.