Flowics Releases Public Beta Of Updated Control Interface for HTML-5 Graphics Solution

Flowics
Flowics has released a beta version of a new Flowics Graphics control interface designed to give artists and operators control tuned to their unique workflows. (Image credit: Flowics)

NEW YORK—Flowics today unveiled an updated control interface for its Flowics Graphics, an HTML5-based broadcast graphics solution. 

"The new graphics control interface is all about efficiency," said Flowics by Vizrt CEO and founder Gabriel Baños. "Graphic artists and operators now have their own workspaces. Operators load only what they really use, and they have greater autonomy over the graphics, like being able to copy and then revise whatever overlays they need. This drives productivity and reduces complexity."

Among the new control interface features are:

  • Updated Rundown Control, which assists graphics operators by giving them the freedom to sort, rename, duplicate and create multiple instances of overlays based on graphics templates without loading all existing overlays.
  • Option to change text, image or data provider when duplicating an overlay.
  • Ability to create playlists over overlays, making it possible to meet all operational scenarios during show production. Operators can build graphics playlists based on the specific rundown to explain which topics will be covered.

The updates decouple graphics authoring and design from operation, creating a distinction between the roles of graphics artist and graphics operator. The more efficient workflow available to teams working in a cloud-native environment make it possible for users to collaborate remotely without needing local installation, hardware or virtual machines, the company said.

Available today as a public beta version to all Flowics customers, the final version is expected to be released later in the month, the company said.

More information is available on the company’s website (opens in new tab).

Phil Kurz is a contributing editor to TV Tech. He has written about TV and video technology for more than 30 years and served as editor of three leading industry magazines. He earned a Bachelor of Journalism and a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism.