Jünger Audio upgrades T*AP processor

The eight-channel TV audio processor now enables remote control of automatic and adaptive loudness control.
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The removable front panel of the T*AP TV audio processor provides remote IP control.

Dynamics processing specialist Jünger Audio has fitted its new T*AP TV audio processor with a removable front panel that enables broadcast engineers to control the device remotely from wherever they are working. T*AP is a wideband, eight-channel processor (8 x 1, 4 x 2, or 6 + 2) that focuses on automatic and adaptive loudness control using Jünger Audio’s Level Magic algorithm.

The new T*AP processor is capable of handling digital inputs (AES) and, through interface slots, all other usual audio formats including all SDI versions (SD, HD, 3G). Using Spectral Signature technology, it also offers dynamic equalization so the sound can be colored much more easily than with a traditional multiband sound processor. Optional Dolby Decoding and Encoding (D, D+ or Pulse), as well as metadata management, are also provided along with 5.1 downmix and Jünger Audio’s 5.1 Upmix circuit.

The removable front panel makes it possible to change settings, view metering and loudness targets and access all Level Magic functions and parameters without ever setting foot in the room where the unit is housed. The removable front panels “talk” to each T*AP unit via IP. There are a number of ways in which systems can be configured; for example, broadcasters can have one front panel controlling several units, or they can employ several panels so individual engineers can control one unit from a number of different locations.

The front panels give status information on all aspects of the T*AP’s operation, including HD/SDI, Dolby and Upmix. This at-a-glance functionality allows engineers to check the status of their broadcast audio and identify and correct faults before they become a problem for their audiences.

Jünger Audio has also incorporated editable preset buttons, enabling individual broadcasters to create their own presets for program types such as sports, news and drama, where different loudness parameters are required.