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Dolby Labs Buys Millicast To Scale Ultra-Low-Latency Streaming

Dolby Laboratories
(Image credit: Dolby Laboratories)

SAN FRANCISCO—Dolby Laboratories has acquired Millicast, a developer platform providing ultra-low latency video streaming capabilities at scale to massive audiences. Financial details of the transaction were not immediately available.

With Millicast, developers can stream the interactive events they build with Dolby.io, such as conferences and concerts, to audiences of more than 60,000 people with delays of less than 500ms, Dolby said.

The Millicast engineering team, which has developed standards such as WHIP, will bolster the WebRTC engineering expertise of Dolby.io. WHIP enables WebRTC interoperability, the company said.

"There is a growing demand to make online events as lifelike and compelling as being there in person," said Marie Huwe, senior vice president at Dolby.io. "We are thrilled to welcome the Millicast team to Dolby. Together, we expand the Dolby.io platform to make it even easier for developers and businesses to stream real-time content and immersive, interactive experiences that look and sound incredible." 

Dolby.io is focused on helping developers and businesses offer audiovisual content and interactive social communications in their applications and services. The ability to scale quality to meet the demands of high-volume streaming for virtual events is critical to Dolby.io’s mission, it said. 

The acquisition of Millicast brings consistent, field-tested ultra-low-latency so that small and large audiences can have high-quality, interactive experiences, it said.

Sample code is available from Dolby.

More information is available on the company’s website.

Phil Kurz is a contributing editor to TV Tech. He has written about TV and video technology for more than 30 years and served as editor of three leading industry magazines. He earned a Bachelor of Journalism and a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism.