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Prism Sound hits the road - TvTechnology

Prism Sound hits the road

The 'From Mic To Monitor' road show will visit universities and colleges in six key cities over a two week period taking in the weeks beginning 17th and 24th November. Each seminar will feature short presentations from the three companies as well as a talk by a guest recording professional aimed at educating a wider audience to the ins and outs of recording techniques
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Prism Sound is taking to the road in November with a series of seminars. In conjunction with Apple and monitor specialist PMC, the 'From Mic To Monitor' road show will visit universities and colleges in six key cities over a two week period taking in the weeks beginning 17th and 24th November.

Each seminar will feature short presentations from the three companies as well as a talk by a guest recording professional aimed at educating a wider audience to the ins and outs of recording techniques.

"We are focusing our attention on the educational sector because we recognise that this is where the producers and engineers of the future are currently getting their grounding in the recording process," said Prism Sound sales and marketing manager Jody Thorne. "The aim is to give students and invited guests from the audio industry a chance to discuss recording techniques and allow them to demo the cutting-edge equipment and software that is currently in daily use in the commercial world."

'From Mic To Monitor' kicks off at the Anglian Ruskin University in Cambridge and takes in the University of Westminster, The University of the West of England in Bristol, LIPA in Liverpool, Salford University, the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester and Confetti Studios in Nottingham.

Speakers will include Simon Woollard from Prism Sound and John Goldstraw, formerly chief technical engineer at Metropolis Studios and now a respected audio consultant.

"We will be looking at product specifications and we'll deal with some popularly-held ideas that are not necessarily truths," Goldstraw said. "With so much of today's equipment being software driven it is increasingly difficult to predict the interaction between software and hardware. This is a key issue that impacts on everyone who is in the business of recording music, particularly those who are working in projects studios and don't have specialist technical engineers on hand if something goes wrong."