Skip to main content

NAB Show: ‘Freakonomics’ Co-Authors Want You to Think ‘Like a Freak’

NAB Show
(Image credit: NAB Show)

WASHINGTON–Stephen Dubner and Dr. Steven Levitt, co-authors of the “Freakonomics” book series and podcast hosts on the Freakonomics Radio Network, will keynote NAB Show’s session “Why the Media & Entertainment Industry Should Think Like a Freak” on April 27.

Described by NAB as some of the “leading minds in next-step thinking, the duo has insight into leveraging new and transformative perspectives to boost innovation and implement measurable business applications."

Stephen Dubner

Stephen Dubner (Image credit: NAB)

NAB Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Global Connections and Events Chris Brown said the media and entertainment community is learning how to navigate the evolving ways of interfacing with data, content and networking.

“We are excited to hear Stephen and Steven’s unique perspective about how ‘thinking like a freak’ has transformed other industries, and how our attendees can use out-of-the-box thinking to boost innovation and implement real, measurable business applications,” Brown said.

Steve Levitt

Steve Levitt (Image credit: NAB)

Dubner and Levitt were approached in 2003 to co-author “Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything.” The book, which applied economic theories to questions about everyday life, has sold more than seven million copies and been translated into 40 languages.

Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and TV personality. He is the host of the “Freakonomics Radio” podcast, which airs weekly on NPR stations nationwide and receives more than eight million monthly downloads. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker and Time.

Levitt is an award-winning economist, author, researcher and podcast host. He is currently a tenured professor and the director of the Gary Becker Milton Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at The University of Chicago. He hosts “People I (Mostly) Admire” on the Freakonomics Radio Network.