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CES 2022: Hisense Debuts its First NextGen TVs

Hisense
(Image credit: Hisense)

LAS VEGAS—Hisense announced its first TV set compatible with ATSC 3.0 (aka NextGen TV) at CES 2022 this week. The company is the first Chinese manufacturer to offer a TV set for ATSC 3.0, joining other manufacturers LG, Samsung and Sony that support NextGen TV.

Hisense is offering ATSC 3.0 support in three of the four ULED 4K TVs it’s showing at CES this week: U9H, U8H and U7H. The top of the line U9H will be available for $3,200 by late summer, the U8H will sell for $1,100 when it hits the market by mid-summer, and the U7H will be available by mid-summer with a list price of $800, making it among the most affordable ATSC 3.0 sets now available.

A fourth member of its ULED range, the U6H does not support NextGen TV but at $580, Hisense calls the 4K set a “steal.”

Hisense is promoting its Mini-LED technology in its ULED sets for improved picture quality. The tech, which was announced a year ago, enhances color, contrast, motion, and brightness, giving viewers automatic adjustments in real-time, continuous scene-by-scene modifications, and fine-tuning each frame down to the pixel. 

“The U9H’s upgraded processor delivers faster, smoother performance and responsiveness, while the 120Hz native refresh rate provides a foundation for smooth clarity and motion handling,” the company said.

The U8H, among Hisense’s most awarded TVs, has received a Mini LED upgrade, which, when paired with Hisense’s ULED technology and Quantum Dot, delivers vibrant colors, impressive contrast, and its trademark bright picture for a “fantastic HDR experience,” the company said.

Also new is the A7H, A6H and A4H Series of affordable Smart TVs, available in ranges of 32-85 inches, as well as a Dolby Vision upgrade for the company’s L9G TriChoma laser projector. Hisense is also debuting a new home theater product, the PX1-PRO TriChroma Laser Cinema 4K ultra short throw projector, featuring a new digital lens focus system that enables razor-sharp pictures from 90 to 130-inches diagonal and the option for consumers to customize their home theater screens.

Tom Butts

Tom has covered the broadcast technology market for the past 25 years, including three years handling member communications for the National Association of Broadcasters followed by a year as editor of Video Technology News and DTV Business executive newsletters for Phillips Publishing. In 1999 he launched digitalbroadcasting.com for internet B2B portal Verticalnet. He is also a charter member of the CTA's Academy of Digital TV Pioneers. Since 2001, he has been editor-in-chief of TV Technology (www.tvtechnology.com), the leading source of news and information on broadcast and related media technology and is a frequent contributor and moderator to the brand’s Tech Leadership events.