PxPixel
Total Traffic Network moves to Empire State building and upgrades to HD - TvTechnology

Total Traffic Network moves to Empire State building and upgrades to HD

NYC area commuters now can get real-time traffic info in HD.
Author:
Publish date:

Total Traffic Network (TTN), a groundbreaking programming and technology serviceis now providing real-time local traffic and incident information from its new HD facilities in the Empire State Building. Viewers see TTN's video footage during local TV station newscasts provided by its cameras covering a wide range of views including many key NYC locations; most major bridges, Yankee Stadium, Citi Field, the UN building, LaGuardia Airport and Central Park.

Image placeholder title

The project included updating older standard definition routing and processing equipment as well as upgrading 32 robotic television cameras located around the New York metropolitan area to improve and increase overall service capability both now and in the future.

Each of the 16 news/traffic helicopters also rely on an Ensemble Brighteye converter, like those used in the Empire State Building upgrade. Each robotic camera is signal processed, frame sync’d and converted (if necessary) by a Brighteye 90 Up/Down/Cross Converter. As older SD cameras are upgraded to HD, the BrightEye 90 will still acts as its signal processor and frame sync.

TTN upgraded from a 16 output Harris Standard Definition XPlus Router to a 32 output Harris High Definition Panacea Router. Ensemble Designs Avenue 7130 DA frames were installed to provide the facility with a mix of SD and HD feeds. The compact design of the Brighteye convertors allowed TTN to install three devices per rack along with seven new cameras. In addition, TTN is now also a client of ‘The Switch-New York' and is linked with a direct 1.485Gbps HD-SDI feed, allowing video to be delivered anywhere in the world.

All of the design and installation work was done with in house staff. The team was lead by Jeff Schick, Television Engineering Director and included Regional Engineer, Steve Doman; Senior Video Engineer, John Bennett and Technical Assistant, Steven Dey.

"Any service changes in a landmark building like the Empire State Building come with many challenges, but the staff took them head on and completed the move on schedule," said Schick. "Immediately after the installation, affiliates were commenting on the improvement over the old SD video, not to mention the stunning high definition video from the seven new cameras."