PxPixel
Civolution’s Teletrax shows Suarez bite beats Neymar goal to be most broadcasted World Cup video - TvTechnology

Civolution’s Teletrax shows Suarez bite beats Neymar goal to be most broadcasted World Cup video

Civolution tracked usage of TV commercials and match action clips throughout the tournament on thousands of TV channels across the world. Luis Suarez’ now infamous bite in the Uruguay vs. Italy Group D game is by far the most aired World Cup video clip on TV worldwide, having run over 10,000 times across 50% of the monitored channels globally.
Author:
Publish date:

Civolution, the leading provider of technology and solutions for identifying, managing and monetizing content, tracked usage of key video segments during the FIFA World Cup using its broadcast analytics solution Teletrax, and found that football’s naughty boy Luis Suarez received the most airtime.

Civolution tracked usage of TV commercials and match action clips throughout the tournament on thousands of TV channels across the world. Key findings are:

  • Civolution tracked commercials aired by the rights holders in the US and UK - ABC and ITV - discovering that on its monitored network Time Warner Cable commercials were the most widely run in the US on ABC, followed by Mazda and Optimum; while Carling, Sony and Santander topped the British channel ITV.

  • Luis Suarez’ now infamous bite in the Uruguay vs. Italy Group D game is by far the most aired World Cup video clip on TV worldwide, having run over 10,000 times across 50% of the monitored channels globally.
  • In comparison, the opening ceremony gained little traction with the release of doves having aired on only 10% of the monitored channels. The spectacular goals during the tournament generated thousands of airings on a global scale, with Neymar’s opening goal for Brazil achieving nearly 7,000 airings across 50% of the monitored channels.

The research data was produced by Civolution’s broadcast analytics solution Teletrax. This monitoring service enables entertainment studios, news organizations, sports rights holders, TV syndicators, advertisers and corporations to determine precisely when, where and how long their multimedia content is being aired on television around the world. It currently maintains a proprietary network of detectors that monitor the television broadcasts of approximately 2,300 channels in more than 60 countries.