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Sports OTT Platform Stream Viral Launches Rev Share Plan

Stream Viral
(Image credit: Stream Viral)

LONDON—The OTT live sports hosting platform Stream Viral has a new revenue sharing model that allows customers on a budget to access an entry level system at a significantly lower cost than a normally priced OTT service offering.

In announcing the move, Stream Viral noted that a ReThink report has estimated that sports media streaming rights are expected to grow from current $50 billion to $85 billion in revenues by 2024 and that the new pricing plan will help existing clubs and leagues create a subscription based online TV channel to capitalize on the growth with a shared risk or reward model that allows smaller clubs to monetize their own content.

“We have a range of top tier customers and leagues, but we were often being approached by lower leagues and amateur clubs who liked the services we offered but were worried about the ongoing monthly costs,” explained Isobelle Benge, co-founder at Stream Viral. “So, we decided to address that where we take a share in the subscription but offer the OTT platform at a much lower cost, in some cases for free.”

“Stream Viral can easily offer a branded TV channel today for many sport clubs to monetize their content which in the past was beyond their realm,” Benge added. “We offer a subscription service that can go down to a relatively low number of subscribers. We are even offering AI solutions to capture content so a live stream can be done without the need of a camera team if required. Every game can be created and viewed live online from anywhere in the world.”

George Winslow

George Winslow is the senior content producer for TV Tech. He has written about the television, media and technology industries for nearly 30 years for such publications as Broadcasting & Cable, Multichannel News and TV Tech. Over the years, he has edited a number of magazines, including Multichannel News International and World Screen, and moderated panels at such major industry events as NAB and MIP TV. He has published two books and dozens of encyclopedia articles on such subjects as the media, New York City history and economics.