Loyola University Maryland completes HD production transition

The Baltimore university is using a variety of HD cameras from JVC as part of its transition of the Communication Department to HD.
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Baltimore's Loyola University Maryland has completed a three-year transition to HD production for its Communication Department built around a variety of JVC ProHD cameras.

Loyola has one GY-HM150 and four GY-HM100 handheld ProHD camcorders, which are used for broadcast journalism courses and Film Club projects. Three GY-HM790 cameras, purchased last summer, are used mostly as studio cameras, while three GY-HM750 cameras, purchased in February 2012, are used as ENG cameras in advanced classes as well as for community service productions. The department reportedly is planning to purchase six more JVC cameras during the 2012-2013 school year.

Herbert Jay Dunmore, television operations manager, teaches digital media courses and serves as engineer for the department. He is also the advisor to GreyComm Studios, a student television production club. Students produce a variety of programs, including news, sports, and reality shows. The organization provides a cross-discipline collaborative experience in digital convergence media to help students "learn in a production environment they would experience post graduation," he said.

Beyond the transition to HD production, Loyola also moved from Apple Final Cut Pro to Adobe and Avid NLE systems. "JVC's dual recording formats and direct-to-edit ability were significant factors," Dunmore noted.

Students are big fans of JVC's use of inexpensive, nonproprietary SDHC media cards instead of tape. Beyond the improved editing workflow, Dunmore said the dual recording feature of the GY-HM150 and GY-HM750 provides additional confidence in the field. Additionally, tapeless acquisition encourages students to use metadata and introduces them to basic asset management.

The HD upgrade of the studio and field production equipment was a top priority of the department. Student involvement and digital media course enrollment has grown by more than 30 percent over the last few years, and Dunmore said the new JVC cameras and other HD equipment have been a big part of the surge.