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Blue Jays to preen presentation with LED display in 2005 - TvTechnology

Blue Jays to preen presentation with LED display in 2005

Rogers Center in Toronto has awarded a $4.5 million contract to Daktronics for the installation of an integrated scoring and display system
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A new LED centerfield video display will replace the existing 33ft high, 110ft wide CRT-based display at Toronto’s Rogers Center.

Toronto’s Rogers Center, home of Major League Baseball’s Toronto Blue Jays, will get a new look in time for the beginning of the 2005 season with the installation of a new LED-based centerfield video screen.

The display is part of a $4.5 million contract awarded to Daktronics to design, manufacture and install an integrated scoring and display system throughout the stadium. The LED centerfield video display will replace the existing 33ft high x 110ft wide $17 million CRT-based display.

Daktronics will replace the display with its ProStar VideoPlus technology. The new display will be the same size as the previous one, and provide greater resolution, increased brightness and improved viewing angles. The new display uses light emitting diode (LED) technology and will cost a fraction of the original display cost.

The installation also includes full color ProStar and ProAd displays and monochrome Galaxy LED displays. Two full-color displays, each measuring about 10ft high x 65ft wide, will be installed in the outfield fence to present out-of-town game scores, stats and other information. Two ProAd displays will be added to the fascia above the right and left field lines. Each will measure about 4ft high x 435ft long. Additional monochrome displays will be installed on both sides of the main video display to present pitch speed and type of pitch, as well as other stats and information. All of the displays will work in concert, operated with a Daktronics control system, which will include Venus controllers, V-Link video processors, DakStats baseball statistics software and other components. The operating system will control more than 4.2 million individual LEDs in the displays.

For more information, visit www.daktronics.com.

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