PxPixel
TechnoConcepts Files Patent Claims for Direct Conversion Transceiver Technology - TvTechnology

TechnoConcepts Files Patent Claims for Direct Conversion Transceiver Technology

Software defined radios (SDRs) use software instead of hardware to modulate and demodulate RF signals, allowing the radio to easily be changed to accommodate different transmission types, depending upon current need. TechnoConcepts announced that it has filed twenty claims for protection of its "Linear Commuting Ampl
Author:
Publish date:

Software defined radios (SDRs) use software instead of hardware to modulate and demodulate RF signals, allowing the radio to easily be changed to accommodate different transmission types, depending upon current need. TechnoConcepts announced that it has filed twenty claims for protection of its "Linear Commuting Amplifier" design, which it said is "a key circuit implementation that enables integrating a commutator (to translate signals in frequency) with its high-performance delta-sigma Analog-to-Digital (A/D) converter to form a direct Radio Frequency-to-Digital (RF/D(TM)) converter as already recited in TechnoConcepts' Delta-Sigma Receiver patent." TechnoConcepts is a fab-less semiconductor company. It has developed technology, which it calls "True Software Radio" that allows multi-mode radios, based on TechnoConcepts system-on-a-chip, that can handle multiple frequency bands, process multiple transmission protocols, be reconfigured on the fly and be easily and cost-effectively upgraded, according to its Web site www.TechnoConcepts.com.

In last week's announcement, Ron Hickling, Chief Technology Officer of the Company explained, "By avoiding the use of conventional superheterodyne front end circuits our RF/D(TM) converter enables the implementation of frequency agile (or wide range frequency programmable) receiver circuits, a unique characteristic necessary for multi-band, multi-protocol wireless devices. The intellectual property we have developed addresses two major problems in the implementation of direct conversion baseband radio. These two problems are very stringent synchronization requirements and the ability to adapt to the large dynamic range of input signals. These problems were solved by the invention of a unique methodology, rather than using traditional automatic gain control and analog discrete component filters. As a result, this has made it easy to manufacture the entire receiver on one substrate (a single semiconductor die). This unique solution substantially decreases the cost and power consumption of the transceiver, making it easier for wide-spread adoption in price and power consumption sensitive telecommunications markets."

Hickling said that he believes TechnoConcept's patent portfolio will generate significant changes within the wireless communications community. "The ability to transmit and receive multiple signals with a single chip will enable dramatic changes in the entire spectrum of the wireless industry as we know it today."

For more information on "True Software Radio" technology, see www.technoconcepts.com/technology.html.