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OmniBus OPUS links up TVNZ production - TvTechnology

OmniBus OPUS links up TVNZ production

As part of phase one of the project, TVNZ had already converted to tapeless operation and as part of phase two, new edit stations and servers were installed alongside OmniBus OPUS G3 technology. The new infrastructure allows OPUS requests from TVNZ's editors, producers and journalists to transfer material between the production sites.
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New Zealand's state-owned public service broadcaster, TVNZ, has installed OmniBus' Opus system as part of the second phase of its Digiknow news broadcasting infrastructure project. Digiknow is aimed at uniting TVNZ's server-based newsroom system in Auckland with similar installations in its regional news-gathering bureaux in Wellington and Christchurch, providing streamlined interchange and sharing of assets between the three sites.

As part of phase one of the project, TVNZ had already converted to tapeless operation and as part of phase two, new edit stations and servers were installed alongside OmniBus OPUS G3 technology. The new infrastructure allows OPUS requests from TVNZ's editors, producers and journalists to transfer material between the production sites.

Transfers are initiated immediately without the former line booking required under the first phase of the implementation and TVNZ is able top maintain much higher image quality throughout the process.

"During the whole implementation period, we had very close and valuable collaboration from OmniBus as we worked out the design of the workflows," said TVNZ infrastructure manager Darryl Walker. "The ability to tailor the G3 desktop to create task-specific interfaces meant that our users found the system very user-friendly and were eager to switch over to the new tools. Features like the ability to display scheduled records on a timeline basis add up to a significant improvement in functionality and ease-of-use."

During a four-month period following installation of the OmniBus Opus, the old and new systems were run in parallel while operators at each site were trained on the new technology.