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Non-profit medical center tightens up broadcast preparations for medical channel - TvTechnology

Non-profit medical center tightens up broadcast preparations for medical channel

MBC is converting DVD, Flash and VHS tapes into digital files using VideoBank's Dual Encoder
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Medical Missions for Children, a non-profit organization serving the needs of seriously ill children in underserved communities across the globe, is revamping its satellite- and Internet-based Medical Broadcast Channel (MBC), which airs presentations on a variety of medical topics provided by eminent hospitals and research institutions across the United States.

The company is using VideoBank's Dual Encoder workstation, Edit/Logger workstation and VBPump to prepare its programming materials for broadcast. The Dual Encoder produces MPEG-2 files for standard broadcast delivery as well as MPEG-1 files for logging applications, while the Edit/Logger processes and prepares the clips for broadcast. The VBPump streams and multicasts the material for satellite and Internet distribution.

MBC's programming content is delivered to MBC on a variety of media, including DVD, Flash and VHS tapes. In order to convert this material into suitable delivery formats, MBC digitizes and archives this content using VideoBank's Dual Encoder, which converts the materials into 4.5MB MPEG-2 files for standard satellite and Internet delivery and 1.5MB MPEG-1 for logging applications.

The VideoBank Edit/Logger workstation allows MBC to add metadata to the clips, as well as perform standard trimming and editing functions in preparation for broadcast and to support its future VOD service. At the same time, editors produce titles and credits for each ingested asset.

After scheduling the broadcast day, MBC producers pass these schedules on to the VideoBank software to create broadcast-ready clips, which are automatically processed and edited together to create blocks of broadcast content. The content is then streamed and multicast using the VBPump utility. The streamed content is picked up by a satellite transceiver that then pushes the broadcast via satellite to medical students and professionals.

For more information, visit www.videobankdigital.com/.