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Survey: Men Think They Still Have Most Say in TV Buys - TvTechnology

Survey: Men Think They Still Have Most Say in TV Buys

Since sports and special sporting events like the Super Bowl, the Olympics, and the World Cup apparently can create some spikes in TV sales, Panasonic and other manufacturers no doubt are grateful that males still have much (not necessarily always the "most") influence in the purchase of new TV sets. Some media items i
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Since sports and special sporting events like the Super Bowl, the Olympics, and the World Cup apparently can create some spikes in TV sales, Panasonic and other manufacturers no doubt are grateful that males still have much (not necessarily always the "most") influence in the purchase of new TV sets. Some media items in recent years have pointed to a clear nod of approval by females to the architecture-neutral nature of HD and DTV flat-screens, especially when they're wall-mounted, since they don't take up half a living room or den like some older analog projection sets.

Two-thirds of men surveyed this month by Opinion Research Corp. for Panasonic said the various decisions on the purchase of new TV sets (where, how much, and what kind) was still theirs to make (albeit, we all know that some are engaging in a lot of wishful thinking--especially since 46-percent of women surveyed said the decision on purchasing was really up to themselves to make!)

The battle of the sexes doesn't end with the decision to buy, according to the survey. About 70-percent of males are interested in purchasing an HDTV set with either large (at least 51 inches) or medium (37-50 inches) screens, while better than three-quarters (76 percent) of women surveyed lean more towards smaller screens, according to published reports.

Yet as for men and their sports, the survey found only a mere 28-percent associate a new HDTV set with "sports events" before other programming. That might sound a tad low, but Panasonic said its commissioned survey was scientific; it was conducted nationwide by phone with 1,061 adults aged 18-65. The margin of error, the firm said, is plus or minus five-percent.