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Thomson Video Networks Coordinating H2B2VS Consortium


Media Technology Companies From Five European Countries to Investigate and Recommend Solutions for Applying HEVC Video Compression Standard
RENNES, France -- March 6, 2013 -- Thomson Video Networks today announced the launch of the H2B2VS project, aimed at investigating the hybrid distribution of TV programs and services over heterogeneous broadcast and broadband networks using the upcoming HEVC video compression standard. As project coordinator, Thomson Video Networks is leading a consortium of 19 partners in five European countries (France, Finland, Spain, Switzerland, and Turkey) to address broadcasting challenges and make recommendations for HEVC standardization.
"Today's broadcast networks have limited capacity that does not easily accommodate bandwidth-demanding new video formats such as 3D or 4K; thus, broadcasters face obstacles in adding these new services to their existing lineup. One valid solution is to use broadband networks to carry the additional information required by the new formats," said Claude Perron, chief technology officer at Thomson Video Networks. "In fact, several of our customers, both terrestrial and satellite operators, are modifying their business models to support broadband video services. The H2B2VS innovation initiative is a clear example of Thomson Video Networks' commitment to supporting these customers during this complex transition."
A project of the Eureka/Celtic-Plus research initiative for telecommunications and new media, H2B2VS is also endorsed by the French "Images & Réseaux" research cluster. The 30-month project was launched in February 2013.
The H2B2VS project addresses broadcasters' requirements for hybrid distribution as well as its impact on other technologies such as DASH, content protection, and content distribution networks, with the goal of proposing solutions to ensure the best quality of experience for end users. Partners will share their recommendations from the H2B2VS project with relevant standards bodies in order to help drive future commercial product development. H2B2VS will provide the opportunity to prototype and test hybrid video services from both a technical and business point of view, with three demonstrations planned in Spain, Finland, and France for satellite, cable, and terrestrial services respectively. For the French terrestrial demonstration, Thomson Video Networks will adapt its ViBE(TM) VS7000 multi-screen video encoding/transcoding platform to support HEVC encoding and streaming.
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About Thomson Video Networks
From the very onset of digital TV broadcasting, the Thomson name has been synonymous with supplying expertise, quality, and reliability to the world's leading broadcasters. Since delivering the world's first large-scale direct-to-home satellite system, Thomson Video Networks has been a global leader in compression systems for satellite, terrestrial, cable, IPTV, mobile TV, and Web streaming. The company helps its customers deliver superior quality video to anything from small handheld devices to large 3D HD screens, with the lowest bandwidth to ensure a profitable business model. A trusted supplier to more than 20 percent of the active channels deployed worldwide, with a global support presence and a reputation for delivering quality at every stage, Thomson Video Networks offers the experience and range of products to meet every need, from hybrid multiformat compression systems to contribution links for content exchange networks.
Information about products from Thomson Video Networks is available at www.thomson-networks.com.
Photo Link: www.wallstcom.com/ThomsonVN/ViBEVS7000.zip
Photo Caption: ViBE(TM) VS7000 Multi-screen Video System
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