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12.17.2004
Originally featured on BroadcastEngineering.com
KOMU turns to Telecast fiber transceivers for Mizzou game coverage


These camera-mounted transceivers put all the common camera signals, including bidirectional video, audio, and intercom, onto fiber and send them to a central rack area.


KOMU-TV8, an NBC affiliate owned by the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO, has purchased Telecast's CopperHead, DiamondBack and Adder video and audio transceivers to build a new campus-wide broadcast system.

The university used the Telecast equipment with its existing fiber infrastructure to feed high-quality broadcast signals to and from Memorial Stadium during the football season and other locations.

KOMU-TV8 wanted a solution flexible enough to handle a wide range of applications on the 12mi strand of single-mode fiber already installed at the university. The broadcast system needed to be portable enough to send multiple camera signals from various venues around campus, including from the football stadium and the new Mizzou Arena to the studio for production.

KOMU's new system is built around four CopperHeads. These camera-mounted transceivers put all the common camera signals, including bidirectional video, audio, and intercom, onto fiber and send them to a central rack area.

From there, the analog video signals are fed to a bidirectional pair of DiamondBack II video multiplexers. Audio and data signals are distributed to Adder 882i audio and intercom multiplexers. An identical DiamondBack II/Adder system is installed in the station's studio, which acts as a centralized control room.

For more information, visit www.telecast-fiber.com/news/press/komu.shtml.

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