03.02.2005 12:00 AM
RF Technologies Offers Antennas for New 700 MHz Services
The FCC has started auctioning licenses for TV channels 52 through 59 and some companies-- including Crown-Castle and Qualcomm -- have already obtained spectrum and announced plans to use it for transmitting TV programs and other multimedia content to cell phone handsets. While any manufacturer's TV transmitting antenna that covers these channels could also be used for these new services, not all may be appropriate for wireless systems that require lower power levels, different polarizations and face more site limitations than broadcast users. RF Technologies recently introduced three new antenna series specifically designed for 700 MHz band applications.

The new series include C700 slotted coaxial antennas, SFNstar700 low downward radiation antennas, and UP700 series wideband panel antennas. RF Technologies says the SFNstar700 series antennas reduce high axial depression angle radiation by 20 to 25 dB compared to standard slotted antennas. This reduces interaction with other antennas on a tower (especially important if two-way transmissions are required) and it allows transmitting antennas to be placed closer to occupied public areas.

For more information, visit RFTechnologies.net.


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