Doug Lung /
08.19.2010 03:20 PM
FCC Again Rejects Petitions from C-band Users to Restrict UWB Device Emissions

The FCC, in a Third Memorandum Opinion and Order and Memorandum Opinion and Order (FCC 10-151), rejected petitions filed by the Satellite Industry Association and Cingular Wireless LLC (now AT&T) arguing that the waiver granted by the docket ET 04-352 Order would significantly increase the potential for interference to C-band fixed, satellite and cellular operation. Throughout the UWB proceedings, users of the 3.7-4.2 GHz C-band spectrum have expressed concerns about interference to their operations.

The FCC left its current rules, including the waiver to allow MB-COFDM UWB system emissions to be measured in its normal operating mode, intact. It rejected worst-case studies showing the potential for interference.

So far, I haven't any seen any advertisements or announcements for consumer UWB devices operating in the 3.7-4.2 GHz band. In the introduction for the Third Memorandum Opinion and Order, the FCC states, "This action terminates the above-captioned proceedings and thus provides certainty for the continued development of UWB equipment, including ground penetrating radars for underground imaging, through wall imaging systems, short-range high capacity data links and other applications." As these devices become more common, I hope the FCC's analysis of the interference to C-band reception is correct.



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