01.19.2005 12:00 AM
End-to-End MPEG 4, Part 10 Codec Unveiled at CES
We have been hearing a lot about MPEG 4, Part 10, also known as H.264, advanced video coding. It promises more efficient coding, resulting in HD images occupying less transmission or storage bandwidth than MPEG 2-encoded images of equivalent quality.

At the recent CES in Las Vegas, Tandberg Television and Broadcom demonstrated end-to-end H.264 coding/decoding for the first time, with Tandberg Television supplying the encoding end and Broadcom supplying the decoding end.

H.264 promises equivalent quality at half the bit rate required for MPEG 2 HD streams. Cable and satellite program distributors are enthusiastic about the possibilities, and some of them have already incorporated H.264 decoding capability into their set-top boxes. Currently, it cannot be used in digital terrestrial broadcast in the United States, which must use MPEG 2 coding by FCC regulation. Presumably, at some point in the future, it might be possible to incorporate both MPEG 2 and H.264 decoding capabilities into terrestrial DTV receivers, and thereby facilitate eventual use of advanced coding in terrestrial broadcast.


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Tuesday 06:00 AM
Eleven FCC Scenarios for The 600 MHz Band Plan
I suspect that the estimated $44 billion of auction proceeds do not take into account the fact that some spectrum the FCC will buy cannot be resold because it must be used as guard intervals in the 600 MHz band plan.~ Charles W. Rhodes

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Archimedia Technology at the 2015 NAB Show

 
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