12.06.2007 11:50 AM
Utility commissioner association helps spread word of DTV transition

The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) is doing its part to help spread the word that analog television transmission will come to an end in February 2009 and prepare its members to help educate the public about the transition.

Last week, the association published a Web page on its site filled with basic information about the DTV transition, why it is happening and how the public can prepare. It offers information from the Federal Communications Commission, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and industry groups.

At an association meeting in July after learning more about the unprecedented scope of the DTV transition, members decided to get involved and help spread the word about the transition, said Rob Thormeyer, communications director for the association.

While association members typically oversee state regulation of the telecommunications, electric, natural gas and transportation industries, some also are responsible for regulating cable TV, he said. That fact plus the common sense assumption that state regulators will hear from the public about the DTV transition led the association to post the Web resources, he said.

“If some of our members don’t know much about this, how can the public know about it?” he asked.

For more information, visit: www.naruc.org/DTV.



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