04.05.2013 03:43 PM
Thomson Video Networks Embraces HEVC
Operators can receive a video stream from a smaller-bandwidth connection
RENNES, FRANCE — Thomson Video Networks has participated in the development and definition of the new HEVC compression standard, which aims at obtaining a bit-rate reduction of up to 50 percent compared to the current state of the art, H.264. With the bandwidth-reduction features of HEVC, operators can receive a video stream from a smaller-bandwidth connection, increasing service penetration at a higher video resolution than with other compression codecs.

At the 2013 NAB Show, Thomson Video Networks will demonstrate its new live and file-based HEVC encoding solution up to Ultra HD format working with various HEVC players. One such device is a player from Japanese mobile operator NTT DOCOMO, which has just announced that it will license video decoding software for HEVC to enable full HD video streaming on smartphones and other devices. The ViBE VS7000 will also be demonstrated with VisualOn’s OnStreamMediaPlayer+ running HEVC decoding on Nexus tablets. OnStream MediaPlayer+ enables playback across multiple platforms, including iOS, Android, Mac OS, and Windows Desktop.

Existing deployments of the ViBE VS7000 can be easily extended for HEVC through a software upgrade and additional licenses for live and offline HEVC encoding. The latest version of the VS7000 will be available in July 2013.



Comments
Post New Comment
If you are already a member, or would like to receive email alerts as new comments are
made, please login or register.

Enter the code shown above:

(Note: If you cannot read the numbers in the above
image, reload the page to generate a new one.)

No Comments Found




Thursday 10:05 AM
NAB Requests Expedited Review of Spectrum Auction Lawsuit
“Broadcasters assigned to new channels following the auction could be forced to accept reductions in their coverage area and population served, with no practical remedy.” ~NAB


 
Featured Articles
Research & Standards
Discover TV Technology