Deborah D. McAdams /
10.17.2012 11:06 AM
HDTV Adoption Surpasses 75 Percent
HD viewing still lags
NEW YORK: HD is the “new normal,” according to Nielsen, but what remains unchanged is that penetration of hi-def TV sets exceeds consumption of HD content. Nielsen’s latest count indicates that more than three-quarters of U.S. households now have HDTV sets—up 14 percent from last year. More than 40 percent of those homes have more than one HD set, as well.

At the same time, consumption of HD content lags behind adoption—as it has from the introduction of the technology into the commercial market. As of May 2012, 61 percent of all primetime viewing was done on an HD set, but just a fraction of those sets were displaying content in true high-definition. Nielsen notes that to get true hi-def, the set must either be decoding an over-the-air HD signal or receiving it from an HD-capable set-top box.

 Consequently, only 29 percent of English-language broadcast and 25 percent of cable primetime viewing was in HD. Sports and entertainment were more likely to be watched in HD than kids’ shows and news.

 “The gap between HD potential and true HD viewing leaves a wide berth for consumers to bridge,” Nielsen said.

 The figures are derived from a study of 17 networks—five English language broadcast networks and 12 cable nets—conducted in May of 2012.
 

 



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1.
Posted by: Anonymous
Wed, 09-17-2012 05:09 PM Report Comment
Part of the problem is cable operators horrible channel numbering scheme. I still see people with HDTV's connected to HD set top boxes or DVR's simply just tuned to the wrong channel. Why is it that cable operators don't simply downmap the HD signal onto the standard channel number if the software deems the set top box is capable of HD signals? I mean really why stick all the HD channels up on some super high channel number? A lot of people bring up the guide and don't even make it up that far. Also when searching for content to record on a DVR, 9 times out of 10 it shows the SD listing in there and they end up just picking it out of accident. DirecTV does a nice job where HD channels are duplicated next to the SD channel number. The default option hides SD duplicates. So say you want channel 10 in HD, you simply type in 10. Not some crazy number in the upper 600's, 800's or over 1000 like some cable operators.
2.
Posted by: Anonymous
Mon, 50-22-2012 02:50 AM Report Comment
asdfasfdas connected to HD set top boxes or DVR's simply just tuned to the wrong channel. Why is it that cable operators don't simply downmap the HD signal onto the standard channel number if the software deems the set top box is capable of HD signals? I mean really why stick all the HD channels up on some super high channel number? A lot of people bring up the gu




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Peer Profile: Tomaž Lovsin, STN, Slovenia
“Will there be a shift from coax to fibre? Or a mixture between the two which will require hybrid solutions to be implemented?”


 
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