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10.07.2005
Originally featured on BroadcastEngineering.com
Devlin Video chooses Snell & Wilcox standards conversion


Devlin will use the new Alchemist Platinum Ph.C at its Times Square facility for HD upconversion and standards conversion of television programming.

Devlin Video International, a New York City-based post facility, has purchased its second Snell & Wilcox Alchemist Ph.C motion compensated standards converter — this time an Alchemist Platinum Ph.C system with integrated HD upconversion.

The new system will provide transparent standards conversion for its increasing volume of conversion and HD work for broadcasters in the United States and abroad.

Devlin will use the new Alchemist Platinum Ph.C at its Times Square facility for HD upconversion and standards conversion of television programming, documentaries, and full-length feature movies. It also plans to use the system in its DVD authoring service, particularly for work converting international movies from PAL masters to NTSC for distribution in the United States.

Two steps are typically needed to convert 625-line SD PAL sources to a 1080/60 or 720/60 HD NTSC output. First, the video is converted from 625 lines to 525 lines, then it is upconverted to HDTV — and 100 lines of vertical resolution gets lost in the process. With the HD-capable Alchemist Platinum Ph.C, however, both the standard and format conversions are done in a single step. Alchemist Platinum Ph.C thereby preserves an extra 100 lines of vertical resolution that would otherwise be lost, resulting in clearer, sharper HDTV pictures for broadcast and for next-generation HD-DVDs and Blu-ray discs.

For more information, visit www.snellwilcox.com.

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