02.02.2007 12:00 AM
APTS Survey Shows Majority of Americans Clueless About DTV Transition
According to a survey by the Association of Public Television Stations, 61 percent of Americans have no clue about the ongoing transition to digital television broadcasting.

APTS revealed that 10 percent of those polled had limited awareness of the DTV movement, and 25 percent said that they were either somewhat or very aware. Fifty-three percent did not know that analog transmissions will end Feb. 17, 2009.

APTS is now urging Congress to target funding to inform consumers about the impending switchover of television broadcasting from analog to digital.

"There are more than 21 million U.S. households that get their TV exclusively free and over the air, and we know these homes are heavy viewers of Public Television," said John Lawson, president and CEO of APTS. "That puts us, working with our partners, in a strong position to provide information about the digital transition to the people who need it the most."

Survey results were based on a sampling of 2,000 U.S. households conducted in the third quarter of 2006. The survey noted that approximately 19 percent of those responding said that they received television programming off-air.


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