03.15.2010 11:35 AM
Schneider introduces new IRND filters for HD cameras

Schneider Optics, a maker of professional filters for film and video cameras, has announced a range of absorptive IRND filters designed for high-definition cameras.

Cinematographers have found that many HD cameras have a high sensitivity to light just beyond the visible range. This can be beneficial in extending the color gamut of digital cameras to closely approach that of traditional film. However, light in the IR spectrum can also cause unwanted false color shifts and prevent the camera’s imagers from capturing true black tones.

To solve this problem, Schneider’s new Platinum series IRND filters limit the light striking the camera’s CCD or CMOS imager to the visible spectrum. By calculating the cutoff frequency in nanometers, Schneider has been able to produce a near-infrared cut filter that lets users of high-definition cameras get the most out of their camera gear.

This means the benefit of an extended color gamut without the worry of unwanted false colors. Eliminating the near-infrared light leakage lets the camera maintain true color rendition in the blacks while maintaining high MTF of its lenses and camera system.

Schneider Platinum series IRND filters eliminate off-axis color shift regardless of the focal length and can be stacked without introducing reflections. They can also be used as a standard ND filter with all HD video and film cameras. Schneider offers these filters in all standard video and cine sizes, including: 4x4, 4x5.65, 5x5, 5.65x5.65, 6.6x6.6 sizes plus rounds in 138mm, 4.5in and Series 9. Each filter is available in ½, 1, 2, 3, and 4 stop densities.



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