05.01.2009 01:30 PM
Obama’s Press Conference Draws 28.8 Million

NEW YORK: Nielsen said the president’s Wednesday prime-time press conference drew an audience of 28.8 million people. The event marked his 100th day in office and pulled in an 18.8 household rating on 10 TV networks at 8 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

Viewership was 29 percent less than the president’s March 24 press conference, which was seen on 11 networks. That telecast brought in 40.4 million viewers for a 25.9 household rating. President Obama’s first prime-time press conference on Feb. 9 was watched by 49.5 million U.S. viewers on eight networks, generating a 30.8 household rating. Around 37.8 million people watched him get sworn in Jan. 20, for a 25.5 household rating.

Fox bowed out of Wednesday’s event, marking the first time a major broadcast network has not carried a presidential press conference. Its cable sister network, Fox News, carried it, as did ABC, CBS, NBC, Univision, CNN, MSNBC, CNBC and MUN2. Telemundo carried it on a tape delay at 11:45 Eastern. 



Comments
Post New Comment
If you are already a member, or would like to receive email alerts as new comments are
made, please login or register.

Enter the code shown above:

(Note: If you cannot read the numbers in the above
image, reload the page to generate a new one.)

1.
Posted by: Deborah McAdams
Fri, 40-01-2009 05:40 PM Report Comment
Amazing that they never missed a Bushie boondoggle since he never said anything of merit. Now, they suddenly decide they have to run American Idol over the US President!!!




Thursday 10:05 AM
NAB Requests Expedited Review of Spectrum Auction Lawsuit
“Broadcasters assigned to new channels following the auction could be forced to accept reductions in their coverage area and population served, with no practical remedy.” ~NAB

Wall Street Communications /   Friday 06:11 PM
Primestream Products on Display at CAPER 2014:
Wall Street Communications /   Friday 04:13 PM
Wohler Products at CCW 2014

 
Featured Articles
Exhibitions & Events
Discover TV Technology