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Originally featured on BroadcastEngineering.com
Jun 27

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6/27/2012 7:18 AM  RssIcon

For the first time, organizers of this summer’s 2012 Olympics in London are offering seats to screenings in Super Hi-Vision video, captured with Japanese broadcaster NHK’s 8K Ultra HDTV technology. It’s the best seat in the house, next to actually being there.

Ultra High Definition TV offers 16 times the resolution of today’s full HD images and includes 22.2 multi-channel three-dimensional surround sound. This is the first time Ultra HD has been shown free to the public outside of Japan. It has been shown at various industry trade shows.

The Ultra HD video will be shown with 8K projectors or on 360-inch LCD displays.

In the UK, the screenings will be at the BBC Radio Theatre, BBC Scotland (Glasgow) and the National Media Museum in Bradford. Other locations will be in Japan and Washington, D.C., however those locations in those cities were not disclosed. The video will be shown with 8K projectors or on 360-inch LCD displays.

The museum will offer free daily screenings throughout the games, from July 28 to August 12, on most days from noon to 6 p.m., showing highlights from the opening ceremony and the previous day’s sports. There’s also a special live feed from the Aquatics Centre on Sunday, July 29, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Before the games get started, the Radio Theater is screening a “London Prepares” promo from July 23rd to the 28th. During the games (July 28th - August 12th) all will have highlights of the previous day’s action from the Aquatic Centre, Olympic Stadium, Velodrome and Basketball Arena plus clips of the Opening Ceremony.

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