Q8: Would You Buy a Set-Top Box for Next-Gen TV?

Would you be willing to buy a set-top box or other hardware peripheral to be able to receive free Next-Gen TV? August 3, 2016
We asked folks to answer 10 questions about “Next-gen TV,” the consumer appellation for the TV content distributed via new technology from the Advanced Television Systems Committee, a collection of engineers charged with developing the nation’s over-the-air TV delivery standard. ATSC 3.0 promises interactive, non-linear and portable functionality, as well as support for 4K and other advanced audio and video technologies.

TV Technology asked a series of questions to gauge the level of interest in these advanced features. We had 101 respondents, 67 percent of whom work in “content creation, app development, media distribution or communications.”

Links to the full results for each of the 10 questions follow the comments.

Synopsis: Responses indicate a willingness to buy a set-top box or other peripheral to receive Next-Gen TV, though several would like to see it built in to their next smart TV.

“I’d prefer to have the tuner built in. Currently, between my cable set-top box, my blu-ray player, and my OTT boxes, I have no free HDMI inputs available on my main TV. I don’t want have to manage another box,” one commenter said.

Others went to cost and the feature set. “Depends on cost of the STB and functionality of Next-Gen services,” another said. Others still have had it with boxes and peripherals all together.

Of all respondents, 42 percent said they would absolutely be willing to buy a peripheral or set-top receiver; 13 percent were not sure; 17 percent said, “No, thank you;” and 28 percent said it depends on the cost.

Comments
  • Versus a new TV for ATSC 3.0 and potential HDR?
  • No thank you. Leave free broadcast TV alone.
  • This is a no brainer as well in today’s society. Make it low cost and easy to implement and there will be no problems.
  • No. History has shown that consumers are being ripped off with these secondary devices and its limits to innovation by having these external devices instead of built into TVs.
  • I won’t be the first on-board, but I understand that people have to upgrade every few years to keep up with the times. I am concerned about the many people who don’t have tech support in the family and can’t afford or don’t wish to spend the money on “Geek Squad” type services.
  • Shut up and take my money!
  • My nex-gen TV is still going—not terribly interested in chucking it.
  • Don’t mind it but it has to be worth the price.
  • Most of us already own (or rent) several boxes, and the software implementation on many of them is horrible. It’s going to be difficult to sell us any more.
  • I don’t agree with having to purchase or lease a box for each TV and monitor in my home, especially if I have to pay for monthly subscription for the DTV experience as well.
  • The industry has too many gadgets connected by too many “standardized” cables, fibers and wireless technologies that don’t work, and manufacturers that blame the box on the other end. I want everything in one box, manufactured by one company so I know who to call when it doesn’t work!
  • I would love to be able to stream off air, TV ads and all. It is a shame all the independents out there and we cannot watch them. They should be able to stream and gain revenues from documented viewers.
  • While I hope tuners for Next-Gen TV will be included in future receivers, there will be a transition period where adapters will be needed just as was true in the transition to ATSC.
  • Only if I can control it fully with no intervention from the service providers
  • I’d prefer to have the tuner built in. Currently, between my cable set-top box, my blu-ray player, and my OTT boxes, I have no free HDMI inputs available on my main TV. I don’t want have to manage another box.
  • Should be built into the smart TV.
  • Price driven!
  • If someone comes up with a Chromecast like HDMI dongle that you plug into an open HDMI port and then just move your antenna from the internal tuner to this new device, I think the general public would quickly move to the new standard. Especially if this dongle sells for $35 or so like a Chromecast. If we have set top boxes that require technical support, moving or installing cables, or other complex and expensive devices, I think we are going to blow this transition like we did the last one.
  • Depends on cost of the STB and functionality of Next-Gen services.
  • This would unleash yuge innovation and development.
  • Sure, but it is getting confusing to have so many ways to receive content.
  • I own two Rokus, two Fire TVs, two Apple TVs as well as a Chromecast.
  • Depends on the cost.
  • Absolutely not. Been there, done that. If my employer buys it for me, I’ll be OK with that. In the meantime, my DirecTV and Internet service providers already provide these features.
  • I don’t have much room and cost is always a factor.
  • Depends on the features!
  • But I still need it delivered via Comcast to my highly restrictive basement condo. Most of we watchers view broadcast TV via MVPDs
  • If it’s cheap enough, sure. I bought an ATSC decoder for my analog TV when it was cheap enough.
  • Too many devices already.
  • Depends on many things.
  • I’ll be one of the first!
  • Cost and content would be important factors.
  • I guess it depends on cost and features. I don’t want another box, unless it really, really makes sense.
  • Definitely. If the box was reasonably priced ($100 or less), I’d be first in line to get it.

  • All 10 Questions About Next-Gen TV...
    Q1: How interested are you in free television service that's interactive, like the internet?

    Q2: How do you feel about a free TV service that activates a device to deliver emergency alerts?

    Q3: How interested are you being able to view free TV on smartphones, tablets and laptops in moving cars, trains, or other mobile environments?

    Q4: How interested are you in the ability to move from TV to tablet to smartphone without missing a scene in a show or a play in a sporting event?

    Q5: How interested are you in a free Ultra HDTV service?  

    Q6: How interested are you in a free TV service that provides immersive audio, replaceable dialogue and other advanced audio capabilities?

    Q7: How do you feel about advertisements based on data mined from your personal media usage?

    Q8: Would you be willing to buy a set-top box or other hardware peripheral to be able to receive free Next-Gen TV? <-You are here. 

    Q9: How much TV do you watch per day? (Include TVs, tablets, laptops, PCs and smartphones.)

    Q10: Do you work in content creation, app development, media distribution or communications?

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